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But Freescale is still providing quarterly reports, albeit for the benefit of its private debt holder. Moreover, the company aims to convert its outstanding debts into publicly traded notes, which means it would have to continue providing full disclosures to the SEC. An eventual public offering would return Mayer and the company's senior management to SOX's stifling embrace.

ERJ-P06D4993V_Datasheet PDF

But Freescale is still providing quarterly reports, albeit for the benefit of its private debt holder. Moreover, the company aims to convert its outstanding debts into publicly traded notes, which means it would have to continue providing full disclosures to the SEC. An eventual public offering would return Mayer and the company's senior management to SOX's stifling embrace.

Although Apple is unlikely to get out of the computer business immediately, it is moving away from that heritage. Even now, anyone who still thinks of Apple as a computer company must be on another planet.

Here's why. In its fiscal year ended Sept. 30, 2004, sales of Macintosh desktop and notebook computers accounted for almost 60 percent of the company's revenue; iPods contributed only 16 percent during that same period.

ERJ-P06D4993V_Datasheet PDF

Two years later, Apple's non-computer sales breezed past the Macintosh unit for the first time. In fiscal 2006, Macintosh sales, though growing, fell to 38 percent, or $7.4 billion, of Apple's total revenue. iPod sales, on the other hand, rose to $7.7 billion, or 40 percent, of total revenue from $4.5 billion (33 percent of companywide revenue) in the prior fiscal year. Adding other non-computer sales, such as music products and contributions from a subsidiary, jacks up total non-computer sales for Apple in fiscal 2006 to 62 percent, or $11.9 billion, of the company's $19.3 billion in revenue.

The launch of the iPhone, continued strength in iPod sales and declining demand for desktop computer products in favor of notebooks, will most likely accelerate that trend. If the iPhone breaks record sales, Apple soon will embark on the next phase of its metamorphosis.

Not even the most ardent Apple supporters–and perhaps not even the company's senior executives–could have foreseen either the speed or the depth of the transformation taking place at Apple. Without a doubt, that change is striking fear into the hearts of rivals in the new markets that Apple has entered.

ERJ-P06D4993V_Datasheet PDF

Hefty valuation

In hindsight, many people must wish they had bought Apple shares years ago. So far, Apple chairman and CEO Steve Jobs' bet on the consumer electronics market has been great for the company and its investors. Ten thousand dollars invested in Apple only one year ago would have doubled by now with room for further increase.

ERJ-P06D4993V_Datasheet PDF

On July 2, 2007, Apple stock closed at $121.26, giving the company a market valuation of about $105 billion. By contrast, Nokia Corp., which last year had revenue of $54 billion– almost triple the $19.3 billion posted by Apple in its 2006 fiscal year–was valued at $112 billion.

Stocks in rival communications equipment manufacturer Motorola Inc.–with $43 billion in 2006 revenue–closed last Monday at $17.64, giving the troubled Schaumburg, Ill., company a market capitalization of just $41 billion, or 61 percent below that of Apple.

Freescale's new rival in the area, Cavium, is rolling out 90-nm versions of its Octeon multicore line for the networking space. Separately, it is also entering the storage processor market with new versions of its Octeon line. Built around a 90-nm process from TSMC, the Octeon Storage Services Processor family is based on a 64-bit, RISC-based architecture from MIPS Technologies.

The processor line, which consists of seven devices, can be scaled from two to 12 cores. The devices also feature storage application acceleration, 10-Gbit Xaui, PCI Express, Gigabit Ethernet ports and dual DDR2 memory. Applications include Fibre Channel and Ethernet disk arrays, RAID controllers, multiprotocol switches and iSCSI adapters. Prices range from $59 to $575 in 10,000-unit quantities.

SAN JOSE, Calif. &#151 Expanding its broadband product portfolio, Infineon Technologies AG has acquired Texas Instruments Inc.'s DSL customer premises equipment (CPE) business.

TI (Dallas, Texas) had been a ''well-established'' provider of DSL CPE products. Infineon (Munich, Germany) plans to continue supporting TI's product portfolio and existing customer designs.

Infineon is a major player in DSL. Combining Texas Instruments' DSL CPE products with Infineon's innovative roadmap leads to a unique end-to-end offering for DSL customers,” said Hermann Eul, executive vice president of Infineon's management board and president of the Communication Solutions business group, in a statement.

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