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Brokers in this industry provide a necessary service to the market,” he said. A broker can help when OEMs find themselves with too much inventory or not enough. This is a service the independent distributor has provided for a few decades, and this is the value I see them bringing to distribution.”

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Brokers in this industry provide a necessary service to the market,” he said. A broker can help when OEMs find themselves with too much inventory or not enough. This is a service the independent distributor has provided for a few decades, and this is the value I see them bringing to distribution.”

At the moment I can find no other information about the book. No table of contents or anything to help flesh out a review of this book. I have requested a copy from them and in addition asked if they would present a chapter of the book here on the EDA Designline. Hopefully I will be able to bring you a lot more about this in the future.

Brian Bailey – keeping you covered

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If you found this article to be of interest, visit EDA Designline where you will find the latest and greatest design, technology, product, and news articles with regard to all aspects of Electronic Design Automation (EDA).

Also, you can obtain a highlights update delivered directly to your inbox by signing up for the EDA Designline weekly newsletter – just Click Here to request this newsletter using the Manage Newsletters tab (if you aren't already a member you'll be asked to register, but it's free and painless so don't let that stop you [grin]).

To meet the growing demand for flash memory used in wireless equipment and other electronics, Sharp Corp. will spend $64 million to secure capacity at Nippon Foundry Inc.

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The Sharp-NFI alliance will allow Sharp access to 6,000 8-in. wafers per month at NFI's plant in Tateyama, Chiba, from the second half of 2001, according to a statement released by the companies. By 2002, the number will climb to 10,000 wafers a month.

The payment, which will account for 27% of the total investment that NFI will require to carry out an upcoming fab expansion, underscores a rising trend among foundries and their customers in building long-term supply partnerships. For example, United Microelectronics Corp., the parent company of NFI, has formed a 300-mm joint venture alliance with Hitachi Ltd. in Japan named Trecenti Technologies. Commercial operation for the venture is slated for next year.

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Sharp said it will use NFI's process technology and manufacturing efficiency to meet the rising demand for products that require flash memory. In addition, Sharp will gain direct access to UMC's sub-0.18 micron capacity. Following the fab upgrade, which also was disclosed today by NFI, the Tateyama fab's monthly capacity will be increased from 34,000 to 40,000 8-in. wafers, the company said.

For UMC, Hsinchu, Taiwan, partnerships with Japan's semiconductor suppliers are becoming increasingly common. At the end of the third quarter, only 2% of UMC's sales came from Japan. However, UMC chairman John Hsuan told investors last month that he expected sales from Japan to continue to grow thanks to stronger demand for digital cameras, camcorders, and other consumer products.

During the press conference to release the annual forecast from the Semiconductor Industry Association, Sanders also blasted the jerks”” and idiots” who he said have confused slowing growth rates with the peaking of revenue.

He chided the press, Wall Street investors, and a number of industry observers for confusing growth rates with chip revenue totals, and said the real problem has been managing expectations in the current boom cycle.

I think the semiconductor industry is about a year and a half into what should be a four-year cycle,” said Sanders, refuting some warnings that growth and revenue will hit a slump in 2001 or 2002 due to an over-buildup of production capacity.

The SIA's U.S. industry consensus forecast sets expectations for worldwide semiconductor growth at 37 percent in 2000, 22 percent in 2001, 10 percent in 2002, and 16 percent in 2003. Released on Wednesday, the SIA forecast shows chip sales growing, from $205 billion this year to $319 billion in 2003.

The SIA forecast shows flash memory being the fastest growing segment in 2000, jumping 130 percent, to $10 billion, and continuing its climb in 2001 with a 44 percent increase, to $15 billion. AMD's Sanders jumped on other industry forecasts that show flash fizzling out.

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