SAN JOSE, Calif. — Taiwan's two major foundry vendors–TSMC and UMC–saw mixed results for the month of September, prompting analysts to worry about ''double ordering'' in the market.

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SAN JOSE, Calif. — Taiwan's two major foundry vendors–TSMC and UMC–saw mixed results for the month of September, prompting analysts to worry about ''double ordering'' in the market.

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SAN JOSE, Calif. — Taiwan's two major foundry vendors–TSMC and UMC–saw mixed results for the month of September, prompting analysts to worry about ''double ordering'' in the market.

Note: The above text is the public part of the press release obtained from the manufacturer (with minor modifications). EETimes Europe cannot be held responsible for the claims and statements made by the manufacturer. The text is intended as a supplement to the new product presentations in EETimes Europe magazine.

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SAN JOSE, Calif. — With little or no fanfare, Tessera Technologies Inc. has accomplished a rare feat: It is one of the few intellectual-property (IP) chip companies that is making money.

But many wonder if Tessera's luck will eventually run out. Still others ponder if the San Jose-based company will rebound from a false start in its new and fledging growth engine: imaging and optics. In this segment, it is taking a bold gamble by attempting to shake-up the CMOS image-sensor component/packaging supply chain, where OEMs are scrambling to cut costs for a new class of camera-based cell phones and smartphones.

Indeed, Tessera faces many challenges. The company's main IP business–chip-scale packaging (CSP)–could see many of its existing contracts and patents expire in the distant future. It prevailed in a recent complaint with the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC), but it remains unclear just how it will realize any payments in a complex case that has chip makers and OEMs reeling.

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Realizing that it needed a new engine for growth, Tessera has embarked on a bold but little-understood strategy that could pay huge dividends–or may simply fall flat. Since 2005, it has acquired five separate companies in the imaging and optics arena.Call it Tessera's big gamble: It hopes to replicate success in DRAM IP, by assembling the pieces to boost the imaging quality and functionally for camera-based handsets, a market that is projected to grow from 987 million units in 2010 to 1.17 billion units in 2011, according to Barclays Capital.

But the company has already seen a slight setback for its Imaging and Optics division, which develops wafer-level packaging for CMOS image sensors, wafer-level optics for camera modules, smart optics technology and embedded image enhancement IP.

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The unit also claims to have the industry's most viable 3-D technology based on thru-silicon-via (TSV) technology. Also in the works is a silent air iconic cooling technology for notebook PCs and other products.

Citing a fall in capital equipment spending, the Imaging and Optics group is projected to exit the year with about $12 million in sales for 2009, significantly down from $23 million in sales last year, according to Barclays Capital. The forecast is down from projections earlier this year, when Barclays predicted that the group would realize $30 million sales for 2009.

The ongoing program is expected to have restructuring costs of $700 million and to achieve higher annual savings than the initially projected $550 million by the end of 2010. So far, $361 million of the restructuring costs have been paid, NXP notified.

The outlook remains cautious and visibility beyond the fourth quarter remains limited, the company said. Although we have recently experienced improvements across all business segments and all regions we are yet to see signs that this represents a fundamental and sustainable improvement of the global semiconductor industry,” the company commented.

NXP said it expects a flat to mid single digit sequential sales increase in the fourth quarter of 2009 on a business and currency comparable basis, excluding wafer sales to ST-Ericsson.

In parallel, NXP said it has revamped its management team with the appointments of Kurt Sievers as general manager for the automotive business and Frans Scheper as general manager for the standard products business.

CAMBRIDGE, UK — Fabricated using Maxim's newest BiCMOS process, the MAX3600 RGB laser driver enables designers to embed pico projectors into compact consumer electronics, supporting switching times below 2ns and resolutions up to WXGA and 1080p.

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