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Cool running Automotives arguably attract the most development work for low-voltage devices in the so-called specific end-user areas, where thermal requirements often are high. Philips' High Performance Automotive (HPA) TrenchMOS devices (ID#49900932) utilizes the company's loss-free” LFPAK package (an SO-8 sized device with enhanced thermal performance). They're suited to engine management systems and motor drivers. Fairchild's 30-V PowerTrench MOSFETs for automotive applications, in their FDDx and FDUx families, tout the lowest RDS available in DPAK (TO-252) or I-PAK (TO-251) packaging. International Rectifier (www.irf.com) introduced five logic-level trench HEXFETs in D2 PAKs for automotive systems, one 40-volt and four 55-volt devices rated from 16 to 75 amps. They also released their IRF2804S-7P, a 1.6 milliohm, 40-V device rated at 160 amps, and their 55-volt IRF1405ZS-7P (RDS of 4.9 milliohms) and IRF3805S-7P (RDS of 2.6 milliohms), rated at 120, and 160 amps, respectively.

ERJ-PA2F8453X_Datasheet PDF

Cool running Automotives arguably attract the most development work for low-voltage devices in the so-called specific end-user areas, where thermal requirements often are high. Philips' High Performance Automotive (HPA) TrenchMOS devices (ID#49900932) utilizes the company's loss-free” LFPAK package (an SO-8 sized device with enhanced thermal performance). They're suited to engine management systems and motor drivers. Fairchild's 30-V PowerTrench MOSFETs for automotive applications, in their FDDx and FDUx families, tout the lowest RDS available in DPAK (TO-252) or I-PAK (TO-251) packaging. International Rectifier (www.irf.com) introduced five logic-level trench HEXFETs in D2 PAKs for automotive systems, one 40-volt and four 55-volt devices rated from 16 to 75 amps. They also released their IRF2804S-7P, a 1.6 milliohm, 40-V device rated at 160 amps, and their 55-volt IRF1405ZS-7P (RDS of 4.9 milliohms) and IRF3805S-7P (RDS of 2.6 milliohms), rated at 120, and 160 amps, respectively.

One respondent was philosophical about outsourcing: Managed properly, and with control elements fully in place, we've found that outsourced direction can be as good as or better than in-house work. The key . . . is agreement and understanding between the parties as to expectations.”

ERJ-PA2F8453X_Datasheet PDF

MethodologyThis Web survey was conducted to take a pulse reading on design outsourcing and explore opinions on this sensitive topic. E-mail invitations were sent to about 11,000 EE Times and Electronics Supply & Manufacturing readers in management positions who are involved in outsourcing decisions. The survey was conducted between Dec. 15 and Dec. 31, 2004. The 303 completed surveys represent a +/-5.5 percent confidence interval. The survey was done for CMP Media LLC, parent company of EE Times and Electronics Supply & Manufacturing, by Beacon Technology Partners (Maynard, Mass.).

PORTLAND, Ore. — Development of a low-cost plastic infrared photovoltaic material by a group at the University of Toronto could herald a major step forward for solar power, its creators believe, by enabling solar-powered systems to also harvest infrared emissions.

The material embeds various-size nanoparticles-or quantum dots-in a polymer suspension. We have designed a plastic device that is physically flexible-you could even paint it onto things by putting it in a solution,” said Toronto EE professor Ted Sargent. However you deposit it, after drying you have a nice, thin, smooth film that provides the basis for an electronic device.”

ERJ-PA2F8453X_Datasheet PDF

Sargent's group had already demonstrated plastic infrared emitter chips, but the new results are detectors.

Sargent believes large-area plastic infrared photovoltaics could become a major marketplace within 10 years, depending on how low their cost goes. But they were not the original research target.

ERJ-PA2F8453X_Datasheet PDF

Our first device was an infrared detector, which converts infrared optical signals into an electrical signal,” said Sargent. As a bonus, because we hadn't anticipated that this would work, we found that it was also a good photovoltaic material capable of harnessing the sun's power.

There are already infrared photovoltaic cells that are not plastic, and there are already plastic photovoltaic materials,” he went on. What we have done for the first time is combine the two to create a plastic infrared photovoltaic material-that has not been done before.”

SBC said it expected the deal would yield $15 billion in synergies, net of the cost to achieve them.

The takeover marks the latest chapter in the reshaping of the U.S. telecom industry. Last year Cingular Wireless, a joint venture between SBC and BellSouth, agreed to buy AT&T Wireless for $41 billion. In December, Nextel and Sprint agreed to merge in a $36 billion deal.

The transaction is expected to close in the first half of 2006 but will still require regulatory approval. Indications are that Michael Powell, outgoing chairman of Federal Communications Commission, will not raise significant obstacles, but the process may be a long one, particularly at the state level.

As recently as seven years ago, then-FCC chairman Reed Hundt branded the prospects of such a deal unthinkable.” Since then, however, the industry has undergone rapid change, with traditional telephone companies now competing with wireless and cable companies.

The companies will argue strongly that this intensification of competition justifies such a merger.

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