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In Sherer's view, there's good reason to provide such groups with EDA tools for a company like Cadence that wants to keep its finger on the pulse of the industry. Even if the particular cores an open-source group is working on today do not prove to be significant, he said, the individuals involved could move on to bigger things. Like Linux developers before them, they could turn into next-generation entrepreneurs with an impact in setting standards in the IP-cores community.

ERJ-T14J753U_Datasheet PDF

In Sherer's view, there's good reason to provide such groups with EDA tools for a company like Cadence that wants to keep its finger on the pulse of the industry. Even if the particular cores an open-source group is working on today do not prove to be significant, he said, the individuals involved could move on to bigger things. Like Linux developers before them, they could turn into next-generation entrepreneurs with an impact in setting standards in the IP-cores community.

Monster.com has grown rapidly since it was formed as a result of the January 1999 merger of two employment Web sites, the Online Career Center and The Monster Board. There were about 1 million resumes posted on the site at the start of 1999; by the end of 2000, there were about 7 million.

In addition to its Web site, the company has two call centers in the US. The larger of the two is at Monster.com's headquarters, and it employs 65 agents, who receive 450 calls a day from existing corporate customers. This center also has a staff of 35 sales reps, who answer 600 calls a day from potential or current customers who dial the company's toll-free number.

ERJ-T14J753U_Datasheet PDF

The smaller center, located in Indianapolis, IN, has 30 agents, who receive 270 calls per day from existing customers.

The two call centers are generally open from 8 am to 8 pm Eastern time, although the Indianapolis office remains open until 9 pm to accommodate jobseekers and corporate customers on the West Coast.

Ned Liddell, Monster.com's director of business applications, recalls that when Monster.com rolled out Siebel 98 at its headquarters at around Thanksgiving 1998, the experience was anything but a holiday. Liddell felt that the systems integrator at the time did not work closely enough with Siebel and did not provide Monster.com sufficient information about the status of the project.

ERJ-T14J753U_Datasheet PDF

The integrator did not escalate issues to management,” he says.

In November 1999, Monster.com was prepared to upgrade from Siebel 98 to Siebel 99.5. With the help of systems integrator Akibia (Westborough, MA), Monster.com dedicated 30 people to testing the software with artificial data to ensure that the company could provide Siebel 99.5 to between 450 and 500 employees. We learned to take control and more risk,” says Liddell.

ERJ-T14J753U_Datasheet PDF

Last November, when Monster.com implemented Siebel 2000, a process that involved consolidating information on its Web server and its database, the company was able to provide the software to 700 employees.

One way that Monster.com intends to sustain control over systems integration projects is by dedicating more staff to them. It increased its team of employees and outside contractors from two in 1998 to between 15 and 20 at the end of last year, and it plans to be able to devote a group of 25 people to systems integration projects by the end of this year. Liddell has found Akibia to be very good about transferring information and leaving gracefully,” which enables Monster.com to retain the experience it gains from each project.

LONDON — Momentum is slowly building for freely available open-source processors, the semiconductor equivalent of open-source software movements like Linux.

A handful of commercial efforts are experimenting with open-source CPU cores. Contract-manufacturing giant Flextronics, for example, is laying plans to tap into open-source hardware for its ASICs. And both Metaflow Technologies Inc. (La Jolla, Calif.) and IROC Technologies SA (Grenoble, France) are building products using the Leon-1, a Sparc-like open-source processor developed at the European Space Agency's Technology Center.

Meanwhile, free cores for Bluetooth and the USB 2.0 interface could become available later this year, open-source developers said.

But the movement has its detractors. Licensees won't be able to go back to the source” — that is, the engineer who created the design. That was what killed IP intellectual-property core brokerage in the 1990s,” said Luke Collins, a principal semiconductor analyst at market research firm Gartner Dataquest (Egham, England).

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