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The challenge in working with China is to strike a balance between the need to successfully compete in a commercial market and protect national security, according to Lisa Bronson, deputy secretary for Technology Security Policy & Counter proliferation for the United States Department of Defense, Washington D.C.

C1206C279C8HACTU_Datasheet PDF

The challenge in working with China is to strike a balance between the need to successfully compete in a commercial market and protect national security, according to Lisa Bronson, deputy secretary for Technology Security Policy & Counter proliferation for the United States Department of Defense, Washington D.C.

TI filed two separate countersuits against Intergraph in May alleging patent infringement of eight patents against a variety of Intergraph products. The settlement announced today resolves TI's current and any prospective patent claims against Intergraph.

As part of the settlement, TI will obtain a patent license to three Intergraph patents which define key aspects of parallel instruction computing. The license establishes a royalty rate to be paid by TI for the use of Intergraph's PIC technology in its TMS320C6000 family of processors.

C1206C279C8HACTU_Datasheet PDF

However, pursuant to the terms of the license, TI has elected to prepay the royalty as a one-time, lump sum payment of $18 million.

Separately, Intergraph reported that the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California has dismissed a patent infringement lawsuit filed by Hewlett-Packard against Intergraph. Hewlett-Packard filed its complaint in May after Intergraph sued Hewlett-Packard, Dell and Gateway for patent infringement last December.

In an order dated Sept. 6, 2003, Judge Martin J. Jenkins concluded that Hewlett-Packard's non-specific allegations do not provide defendant with 'fair notice' of what plaintiff's claim or claims are,” and dismissed the complaint. Hewlett-Packard has 20 days to amend its complaint.

C1206C279C8HACTU_Datasheet PDF

In another matter, Intergraph reported that a Sept. 5, order from U.S. District Judge T. John Ward sets the trial schedule in Intergraph's lawsuit against Dell, Hewlett-Packard and Gateway. The trial is scheduled to begin in August 2004. Intergraph filed a lawsuit last December in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, charging the three companies with infringing computer system-level patents related to cache memory management technology.

MANHASSET, N.Y. — Intel Corp. has made algorithmic and processing-speed upgrades to its Manitoba cellular processors, moves the company said will allow it to handle baseband and applications-processing requirements of Edge (Enhanced Data rates for GSM Evolution) applications.

C1206C279C8HACTU_Datasheet PDF

Paired with an RF front end from RFMD, the upgrade is designed to lower the development costs and speed time to market for developers hoping to ride the migration to Edge from GSM/GPRS. Intel is betting that migration is well underway.

We see a rapid transition to Edge occurring right now, especially within the U.S.” said David Rogers, marketing manager at Intel's PCA components group. Rogers said he doesn't expect Europe to follow suit. Quoting figures from IDC, he predicted the U.S. market would move from very few Edge subscribers today to over 15 million by 2007.

Not waiting for the standards process, National has started sampling two SuperI/O chips and two temperature sensors that use an approach based on a new sensor bus that the company has defined.

The National architecture essentially replaces today's practice of sending analog data down relatively long motherboard traces over the two-wire Systems Management Bus (SMBus) to a Heceta ASIC, typically to monitor CPU temperature. Instead, National advocates a single-wire SensorPath bus that could connect as many as seven temperature, voltage and other sensor devices sending digital data back to a SuperI/O chip.

The National approach could provide greater accuracy of readings and finer-grained control of system-level temperature and fan speeds, said John Hull, director of marketing for National's advanced PC division, and it would cost less to implement.

Hull noted that the upcoming Prescott version of Intel's Pentium 4 processor dissipates up to 100 watts, while Intel is promoting a small form factor initiative for desktops and OEMs are trying to reduce the number of fans in their home systems to one or none.

This is a big problem on the PC motherboard these days,” Hull said. And there's too much stuff connected to the SMBus today. That can be an issue at boot-up time.”

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